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>> welcome to the "journal" here on dw. acknowledgment, no apology -- france's president says french colonial rule in algeria was brutal. >> the united nations warns that the fighting in syria is becoming a sectarian war as yet more islamist fighters arrived from abroad. >> it is 200 years since the grimm brothers' first published stories that continue to bring trembling and joy into children's lives -- the grimm brothers first published stories that continue to bring trembling and joy into children's lives. the french president is in algeria to commemorate that country's 50th anniversary of independence from france following a bloody war that cost 1.5 million algerians and tens of thousands of french their lives. >> hollande praised algeria's steps toward democracy as paris looks to deepen economic ties with the oil-rich former french colony in north africa. >> enthusiastic crowds greeted the french president as he walked the streets of the capital algiers. despite his security, many onlookers even got a chance to shake hollande's hand, seemed unconcerned by the bitter histor
france should give itself more leeway to meet mission targets. the company's 3% of gdp with more pressing -- than cussing excess from public finances. the imf has warned against more tax hikes warning these could further restrict growth. he says it's built a bit of momentum, but still needs to do more. >> france has to reform. france cannot -- that can avoid reforms. it can be again reforms which might be different. but we need to reform. let me say that from that perspective, the recent decisions going the right direction and i think that the government has understood the need to help companies create jobs. so what is important is that this momentum is there going forward. i mean, the momentum, positive momentum regarding the negotiation between the trade unions and the corporate buddies to give more flexibility to the labor markets, to give the ability for corporates to adapt more quickly. it's very important that the government complies with reducing the budget deficit and reducing public spending. we have too high level of public spending. and if you reach the level of taxes is too hi
against the dollar, trading at a value of $1.3175. >> turning to france now where the economy is set to show minimal growth in first half of next year, according to the french national statistics institution, who predict a rise of 0.1%. >> france's economy also barely grew over the course of this year, but in what many analysts see as overly optimistic, paris has set a growth target of 0.8% for 2013 and says it is still confident it can cut its deficit to below the you-mandated level. a german power utility is cutting 1300 jobs as part of a 750 million euro cost-cutting program. >> it is germany's third biggest power company. most of the job losses will be among support and administrative staff. the company has struggled financially from having to shut down to below of its nuclear reactors over safety fears in the wake of the fukushima disaster. >> ratings agency standard and poor's has downgraded cypress again. its sovereign debt already has junk status. now it has gone down two more notches. >> cypress says it needs a decision on an international bailout within days to avoid a defa
to france and the u.s. for help against a rebel coalition that has vowed to topple his government. france has declined to intervene against the rebels who have already taken several towns and are now advancing on the capital. >> heavy snow has paralyzed large parts of eastern canada. in montreal, traffic came to a virtual standstill. police are telling people to stay at home, as some areas are expected to receive almost half a year of additional snow. well, we are going to a short break. after we come back, we will look at europe's crisis year 2012. >> we will find out how it will be a year to forget for one of germany's top swimmers. stay with us. >> welcome back. in just three days' time, we will be seeing up the old year and welcoming in the new, but before that, we will be taking the chance to reflect on some of the main events of the task 12 months. >> in europe, it was all about the debt crisis. greece and spain were the worst hit. >> eventually, it was the european central bank's controversial bond-buying program that manage to come down the markets -- calm down the markets. >> ger
. we don't have that here. >> i hope we are not on the air in france and germany. you are killing these poor people. >> they are killing themselves. look at their numbers. want you want to have them. >> they are happy except for millionaire necessary france. >> which is why they are leaving for belgium which is a tax-haven. 75 or 85 percent. ments to work there? last word from steve. a push to ring in the new year with a mileage tax. will it drive your economy off of the cliff? >> and colleges cashing in. they are collecting more application fees and not letting more students in. >> college is maching an increase . critucs call it a money grab. that is it a flip side. they have stocks set to >> believe it or not, colleges are enticing more kid toz apply to their schools and admittinga fewer students in their schools. they do it to make themselves look more exclusive. not only are they doing to to boost the national ranking but it is it a cash grab. and john is okay with this. it is ut arely irvelrant. you must be smart. it is playing and racking. and unless we take over all of the
are not on the ai in france and germany. you are killing these poor people. >> they are killing themselves. look a their numbers. want you want to have them. >> they are happy except for millionaire necessary france. >> whi is why they are leaving for belgium which is a tax-haven. 75 or 85 percent. ments to work there? last word from steve. a push to ring in the new year with a mileage tax. will it drive your economy off of the cliff? >> and collegesashing in. they are collecting more application fees and not application fees and not letting more students in. [ malennouncer ] it's tt time of year again. time for citi price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you realldon't want to pay more thayou have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it findone,ou get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all youeed is a magic carriage. citi price rewind. start saving at citi.com/pricerewind. you know how painful heartburn can be. for
situation. one part of europe is doing very well. germany, france, northern europe, generally speaking. italy, spain, portugal, greece and ireland, hungry are in terrible shape. serious terrible shape. and because some folks don't pay attention to numbers, here's a chance for a statistic to help. students of mine, professors who came to the united states to study the universities where i taught. now professors at the university of acton, major universities increased. today their salaries as we speak are 40 percent less than what they were in may of 2010. try to imagine yourself in a job that you've kept in which the money you get every week is 40% less. police, fire, school teachers, social workers, you name it. .. governments in france and germany have been very frightened since they too are facing an economic crisis and they too are trying to solve it by making demands of their people to pay for something we come in to. they have chosen to use a very dangerous strategy particularly warm germany and the strategy goes like this. we the government are your friends, you the german workin
be involved. france on the other hand -- france and spain leading the charge, saying that this must be done now. financial markets are being very good and not panicking, but if they see continued failure of eurozone finance ministers to agree to this, we might get the restoration of finance of duties, which of costa much trouble in recent years. the deadline for agreeing is no overarching bank advisory super body is meant to be in place on january 1. it does not look likely, and a lot of frustration at this meeting today with the sides deeply divided and no sign of agreement. that, of course, is the basic issue -- why has there not an overarching supervisory control? precisely because it was difficult to do then. the eurozone crisis highlighted that failure, and we've still got the same problems blighting the regular meetings of finance ministers. >> despite the eurozone crisis, german exports are still robust. >> we will have the latest on the german export data later on in the program, but first, in britain, the duchess of cambridge is said to be feeling a little bit better after spending
quarter. the eu, banking -- things like nap but, again, still down. >> not great news for france if we start to look at some of the indexes. there's a lot of focus on this economy. >> exactly. and the weakest spots, given that it's the second largest economy. now, we did see that return to growth for germany, which is a positive and will be a good gain forward. but say order box, very weak. demand, very weak. business confidence very weak and this is going to be hitting activity indicators going forward. >> even though the manufacturing side of it disappointed, the services was stronger. while services is a big part of the economy, it's where we're trying to see the rebalancing in the german economy happen. from that point of view, probably a rather encouraging development. >> it is interesting. it's also very exportwise. what we saw on these numbers was german exports falling sharply again. and this is just signaling that global economic conditions, soft patch very weak, particularly for the region -- i'm sorry, within the eurozone itself. >> and it's consistent with the weakening glo
cementmaker dipped to restructure its european operations. they could put charges of over 500 million francs. carolin has more out for us out of europe. >> hey, ross. let's take a look at the market reaction. initially, the reaction on the markets is quite subdued. now accelerating its declines, off by 7.1%, the second worst decliner on the market. let's come back to holcim. it is responding to the sluggish construction environment in europe and that is why it's restructuring its european operations. it is taking a $440 charge on write-offs for property plan and equipment. on top of that, it sees an additional 1100 million swiss francs in costs for the fourth quarter. so the overall hit to the fourth quarter will be 500 million swiss francs. it does say that the rebound will save around $120 million swiss francs annually. but overall, analysts are surprised about the size of the additional write-offs that will be booked in the fourth quarter. but holcim is trying to reassure investors this morning, saying there is still potential for a dividend payout for 2012 but that decision will be taken
almost 5,000 world war ii veterans. mr joy's story was exceptional. he dropped into occupied france in may of 1944, hit his radio in a box of green beans calm but train occupied -- they set up a save house in france and transmitted some of the most important intelligence of any agent to the 16 for 16 on troop movements, oil refineries, airstrikes, it is incredible. he also was able to rescue hundreds of downed airman. three months ago i got a call that renee had passed away. i interviewed mr. deloitte at his house in 2002 and he was the first person he ever told this story about. is wife was kind enough to give me some teach and was an incredible interview as he brought me back in time. his son told me something very striking. arlington had denied their request for burial because at the time of the war he was a french citizen even though general eisenhower had personally given him the distinguished service cross and he was in uniform, american uniform after the war, he became an american citizen as well as a world-renowned heart doctor who had an incredible things for america. to ma
. the imf estimateds that the u.k. next year will grow more strongly than france or germany, and our credible fiscal policy allows for supported monetary policy. and with the bank of england, we are directly addressing the problems of tight credit through the 70 billion pound funding for lending scheme. in the opr's view today, this has lowered interest rates in the real economy and will add to the level of real gdp. one area where the british economy has done much better than forecast is in creating jobs. since early 2010 the private sector has created 1.3 -- 1.2 million new jobs, 600,000 more than was predicted, and youth unemployment has been falling. instead of peaking at 8.7%, the ob russian expects the peak at 8.3%. this at a time when the unemployment rate in spain is 26%, in france it is almost 11%, and across the whole eurozone it is almost 12%. employment, already at a record high, is set to go on rising each year of the forecast, and for every one job less in the public sector, two new jobs are expected to be created in the private sector. britain now has a greater proport
in swiss francs. but because we are, again, operating in so many countries, having local costs, local currency costs as well as local currency revenues, we don't have any dilution of our profitability because of the strength of the swiss franc. so, actually, the more the swiss franc appreciates, you know, it has absolutely no effect on our profitability. it has an effect on the translation standpoint that it's stronger on the basis. >> okay. some interesting points. i think what's interesting is when you come here, we got a meeting today, kelly, of the account and they're going to approve pakistan later. but working on the bits of the doha rounds. one of the things that's going to be interesting is particularly the supply chaines and global exports. that's one of the things they think they can get pretty good progress on. for example, good at a port. why does the kaber have to be held up for sort of a week or two weeks and not put straight into the country? a lot of international countries saying that's a bigger hit on earnings than 1% or 2% in duty. it's getting this in the increasin
concerned about france and spain than i am about italy. >> we'll talk about those. >> let me add asking. if italy is in this situation now, it relied on the easy way out. and politicians, including berlusconi, didn't have the foresight to see that. >> thank you so much for coming by. >>> staying at the eurozone, investors will be watching for anything coming from the italian crisis. the results of the spanish bond actions are due around 12:40 cst. hsbc was hit with a $1.9 billion fine. the ceo said we accept responsibility for our mistakes and are profoundly sorry for them. >> a full year loft loss of 4.7 billion euros, thinksen krup has more details. >> they are starting to look at the positive of what i would call a -- strategy, i.e., a clean sweep when it comes to the business strategy of thyssenkrupp as well as the instruct occur and the refocusing on being transparent and definitely being something shareholders should trust. so no dividends, jobs may go and the sale of celiamerica being looked at. the cfo says there's a handful of interested parties in that particular party of the
-care system. >> you did a calculation that showed a health care system, the best in europe or france or germany, we would have no deficit in the baby boom demographics. >> everyone else -- canada is a single payer system but not socialized medicine. medicare for everybody. and is complicated. but it is a mixture of public provision, public health insurance but much heavier hand of government, the same cost as the canadian system but spectacularly good outcomes relative to anybody and britain has a system which is pure socialized medicine and the outcomes are a little better than ours. the cost is 40% better. all of these, if we were able to emulate these things we would be able -- our budget problems would be gone -- and it defies -- one of our two presidential tickets, the signature proposal is to take one of the parts of the system that works pretty well and privatize it. [talking over each other] >> let's make sure nobody gets to do what i did as governor of massachusetts which is privatize medicare. privatize and underfund which is incredible. it is a rejection of both theory and
-- and increased focus on the origin of the food served. the recipe for this buckwheat pancakes is from france. the organic eggs sourced locally. regionalization and globalization at the same time. the finished mulled wine index is steadily climbing. more sophisticated, source will feel right at home here. the one-euro entry price will not be much of a financial setback to anyone dining here. a one-star chef serves gourmet specialties, and the dancers are a far cry from a traditional manger scene. not to mention the products. this necklace costs 480 euros. or how about an ivory tusk from an extinct mammoth? the specialty products for sale make the markets popular with international customers. >> a lot of things are handmade and not chinese. >> we have one in manchester. i wanted to see what the difference was. much better. >> christmas markets are a big draw for tourists and locals alike. this year's offerings are sure to delight a variety of pallets and budgets. and if there was any doubt, winter has most definitely arrived in germany. >> oh, yes, it has appeared the first bill falls in the c
figures from france are not encouraging. the french office of -- statistics office says the jobless rate rose to 10.3% in the third quarter of 2012, a 13- year high. youth unemployment remains at a particular problem -- nearly a quarter of adults under the age of 25 are without a job. that is the highest rate since youth unemployment statistics were introduced in 1999. turning to the markets now, that news from the european central bank was not all gloomy. our correspondent sent us this update from the frankfurt stock exchange. >> in his press conference in frankfurt, the ecb president also said that he expects inflation in the eurozone to fall below 2% next year, which means price stability, and it also means that the door for more interest rate easing by the ecb remains open, something that the stock market should profit from. this thursday also brought along very positive data from the german economy. the german manufacturing sector posted a significant increase of factory orders in october. something which gives hope for the industrial production in the months to come, and it also gi
or medicine, physics, chemistry, and economics went to eight winners from the u.s., japan, france, and britain. >> the nobel prize for economics was jointly awarded to allan ross and lloyd shapley for their work on matching supply and demand -- alvin roth and lloyd shapley for their work on matching supply and demand. 89-year-old lloyd shapley, professor emeritus at the university of california, received a standing ovation. >> while the eu is celebrating winning the nobel peace prize, one of its largest member states has been plunged into crisis. >> first data appeared that italy was facing the prospect -- first, it appeared that italy was facing the prospect of uncertainty as mario monti appeared to be on the prospect of resigning. that pushed the stock market into a downward slide. >> in the last couple of hours, prime minister mario monti has come out and said he is not planning to step down in the near future after all, and that the nervous reaction in the markets should not be dramatized. >> investors are already nervous about what mario monti's early departure could spell for the eurozon
. >> the filmmaker's daughter was allowed to travel to france, standing with eu leaders to take the prize that her father could not collect himself. >> wednesday is a special day for many couples around the world to have chosen december 12, 2012, as their wedding date. >> 12 pairs of brides and grooms tied the knot at one ceremony in hong kong. for the chinese, the number 12 has another special meaning. it symbolizes unity. 12/12/12 is a pretty easy date to remember, so there is no excuse to forget your anniversary. you are already married. >> i married on friday the 13th. >> also not an easy anniversary to forget. >> see you soon. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org--
:20 central time, we'll speak to the world travel council to find out why france is still the world's top destination but more money is spent in the u.s. and central america is now a star performer. first, we want to get the latest news. looking for confidence out of germany's ifo survey. if we can put it up on the screen, that would be a help as i'm working to get it up at the moment. as soon as we get the numbers on that front, i will bring them to you. looks like we're still waiting on that. in the meantime, send in your thoughts, questions and comments about the program to worldwide@cnbc.com. and the biggest news of the morning, we have a deal. after 14 hours of talkes and months of negotiations, an agreement has been reached on a pan european banking supervisor. european finance ministers say they've drawn up plans to allow the ecb to directly supervisor the three largest banks in each country except for the uk and sweden which have both opted out. european leaders need to give their seal of approval and silvia wadhwa is in brussels with the latest. sylvia, it sounds like the meeting
in italy, spain, and france proved especially wary. only britain bucked the trend with a rise in new car sales. a decade it has been since the inclusion of the german media empire. the state appellate court in munich today ruled that deutsche bank must pay damages to the heirs of the deceased mogul. >> the court ruled that the former ceo of deutsche bank, seen here, was responsible for the collapse of the world's largest licenser of film rights. in an interview, this credit worthiness was question, driving the conglomerate into bankruptcy. damages are expected to range anywhere from 120 million euros to 1.25 billion euros. it was also a big topic at the frankfurt stock exchange today. our market correspondent gave us this report from the trading floor. >> for the deutsche bank, this verdict is more than just a verdict because it weighs heavily on the image of germany's biggest bank. also because of the fact that the trial is not the only one that the deutsche bank is faced with, and some analysts are fearing now that investors might lose their confidence in dutch bank and sell their shar
across germany. for more now, we had to the franc fort -- frankfurt stock exchange. positive news on the german economy. has that brought some cheer on the floor there? >> this is indeed a very nice christmas present and a strong signal that the german economy will recover again after its winter sleep, but the dax did not make a huge step forward. the stronger than expected ifo index may prevent european central banks from lowering interest rates again. >> we have had developments also in a libor scandal that broke earlier this summer. tell us about that. >> yes, the news is very bad. ubs has to pay the record fine of 1.2 billion euros in this libor scandal and its manipulation of interest rates. some british banks also have to pay millions of euros, and also deutsche bank is involved, and it is also in focus because exactly one week ago, hundreds of policemen into a bank in search of proof of tax fraud. hsbc has to pay $2 billion in a money-laundering case. the financial industry is working very hard for its bad reputation. the german dax is up 0.3%. euro stoxx 50 up .3%, and the
, they were the uk and france in joint plays. >> i was hoping maybe the uk would get an olympics boost, but it appears to be still trailing italy by quite a ways. but there were no italian locations in the most instagram places until the world. six california locations made the list. and the top two places most snapped and shared on instagram may surprise you. they were the shopping mall in bangkok, thailand t b, and the sunni's airport. >> where is your top place that you would like to go, christian? >> i think i go with the americans here. i think it looks most likely that we're going to be in italy. >> i thought you meant he were going to the americas. but that's all right. >> i'm going with the americans will be. >> where in italy? >> sicily. sicily looks -- first of all, it's some place i've never been. in london any time of the year but certainly in summer. >> are you an instagram user? >> i am not. >> where do you want to go, kelly? >> in 2013? >> yes. >> i suppose i get around to see more of europe. i would love to go to russia and see moscow and st. petersburg. >> don't go in
and there are shootings and killings in norway and france and germany, but there hasn't been 61 mass killings like there have been in this country to a sense columbine. >> and the nra facebook page has gone dark. we will speak with lisa graves about big guns and big money. all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. residents of newtown, connecticut, have begun holding the first of many kernels for the 27 victims killed in friday's shooting rampage at sandy hook elementary school. on monday, noah pozner and jack pinto, 06 years old, were laid to rest in small caskets. more funerals are slated today including two more 6-year-old victim's, james mattioli and jessica rekos. at the white house, president obama convened a meeting with top officials to discuss ways to respond to the newtown massacre, including potential proposals for gun control. pressed for details, white house press secretary jay carney reduced offer any specifics on how obama plans to address the nation's gun violence. >> is a complex problem that will require
to the rest of the world, if you look at germany, uk, japan, france, all of whom have very strong gun regulations, we have more gun deaths in one week than they have in an entire year, and the incidents -- the number of times in which guns inside a home are used for self-defense are exceedingly small, on the order of maybe 1 in 15, 1 in 20 as compared to the number of times when a gun is used either for suicide or a homicide. anybody that looks at the data here is quite clear that on the whole, particularly things like assault weapons, create far, far more kor nage in th carnage in this country than they prevent. to a large extent the reason why i think progressives have not been able to mount an effective campaign for sensible gun laws, it's been a failure of the progressive movement, and i think that will now change with progressives. they must realize they have to make this an election issue. all of the polls show that the public is widely in favor of sensible gun regulations. i will point out what i said on friday. president clinton after columbine when we were meeting in the oval
. britain had three, was slowly losing common-law, france, germany and most european states had three, but some european states saw their religious character already beginning to fade. but around the world in africa, asia, latin america, few states had common-law and property rights with titles and deeds. america first came to world prominence after the spanish-american war ended in 1898. at the first time, it's argued that the u.s. acquired an empire with cuba and the philippines. yet, this were only revealed the deep differences between america and everyone else in history. for one of the first things, the american congress did after the war was pass a law requiring the united states to give up the cuba. one searches in vain for major world power to ever voluntarily departed from concord region. at the 20 century gun, a group of liberal elites who embrace the program loosely known as progressivism, challenging, criticized these four pillars. most were hostile to common-law with president woodrow wilson being the prime example of one who thought the constitution needed tv malleable a
>>frank: francs. this is on the libor manipulation charges. ubs must pay swiss regulators $59 million in profits because the regulator can't fine ubs. the fine from the fsa is the biggest ever, 160 million pounds, $1.2 billion will go to the u.s. regulators. so the second biggest fine that was ever handed to a financial institution. of course, following that $1.9 billion fine that was given to hsbc. what we do know is that the company is admitting criminal wrongdoing in its japanese arm because, you know, around 30 traders worldwide had manipulated the yen libor between 2005 and 2010. the ceo speaking this morning says, you know, despite the troubles in the japanese arm, he does not believe that there's -- the bank is going to be shutting down the operations in that country entirely. saying that 30 to 40 people have already left the bank. they also gave us a bit more information on what kind of impact this will have on profits. they see a fourth quarter net loss of around 2.5 billion swig franks. a full-year profit of 2.5 to 3 billion. and the most important part, why shares are trading up. they
roughly speaking in the likes of italy and france and actually grew for germany. then in q4, it seems that there is a greater degree of destocking i think, materializing. i think that is going to lead to some weakness on the industrial production side and it does appear that the austerity is very much perceived by household and by service sector companies. and that explains this relatively soft data. it's a sign that really we are still in a period of multi-year major fiscal entrenchment and at the same time, we have a very cautious perspective towards taking on debt. both by the suppliers and the demanders of that debt. >> julian, very briefly, will we see more qe? will we see any more next year or not? >> well, it will depend, i think, on how things develop. on our baseline forecast, the answer to that would be no because we are looking for recovery coming through really reasonably significantly from the first quarter of next year with .4% quarter on quarter. >> julian, thanks for that. always good to see you. julian kelly joining us from barclays. which country is more corrupt and
, french actor gerard depardu, he is leaving home, leaving france because of higher taxes and handed in his passport. now, the french prime minister has some choice words for mr. depardu. he's obviously in the happy with him and find out exactly what he said at ten o'clock eastern time this morning. time is money. 30 seconds, here is what else we've got for you, an in japan, again, a landslide win, so, what's the new prime minister going to do about the world's worst debt problem? print more money and stimulate more, too. build more infrastructure. will that work? we have our own resident japan expert. question, is jeff immelt's cozy relationship with the president costing general electric shareholders money? we will be discussing it. and i lost on friday when i questioned "the washington po " post's" claim that the senate would be better with more women. i'm not done debating that. more coming up on this program today. and we want to hear from you as well. send your e-mails to varney@foxbusiness.com and we read them on the air. and we read all of them, by the way. i've got news, clearwire
with what's happening there. >> okay, rick, huge in france. we know french economy not that good. women want to make some money during this period. france is strong for you. >> we've grown, almost doubled the company in the last five years in france. we're the biggest company of our kind in france. we're the largest seller of cookbooks in france. we had some issues the first two quarters, during the election, as you know, most of the consumers sat on the sidelines. we're starting to see it come back to life again. so we feel very good about france. ditto germany. >> isn't that incredible. >> rick, 52-week high when compared to avon. incredible. thank you so much for joining us. >> good to be here. >> good to see you. >> all right. stay tuned. sfx- "sounds of african drum and flute" look who's back. again? it's embarrassing it's embarrassing! we can see you carl. we can totally see you. come on you're better than this...all that prowling around. yeah, you're the king of the jungle. have you thought about going vegan carl? hahaha!! you know folks who save hundreds of dollars by switching to ge
that account for rising income inequality in canada or, indeed, even in france, in germany, in the united kingdom? i mean, it's happening all over the world, it's also happening in emerging markets. but i think it is important to face that scary because if you see it just as a political phenomenon, you know, you're going to lose sight of what i think is the biggest challenge which is that these, actually, quite benign economic forces, right? i love the technology revolution, i'm a google addict. they're also drivers of social and political consequences which are not quite so benign. the way i like to look at it, and this is a quote from peter orszag, is, you know, how he sees it is he said, look, the big drivers are probably these economic forces, but the issue is that particularly in the united states the politics instead of trying to mitigate these very powerful economic forces has exacerbated them. so even as you have these economic forces creating much, much more concentration at the very top, you expect politics to sort of try to so much that blow. social institutions to soften that
, including canada, germany, great britain, japan, france-- why are their gun deaths so much lower than ourselves? i mean, john howard, a very conservative prime minister-- former prime minister of australia said we don't want the american disease in australia. why is it that all these other countries don't seem to have this problem? >> well, they have soo they have a homicide problem. they have a violent crime problem. in britain, it's four times what ours is. they don't have as many guns. that doesn't prevent killing. it doesn't prevent mayhem. it doesn't prevent violent crime. >> schieffer: you don't really believe people armed with baseball pats batcan somehow kill more people than people armed with guns. >> in this country, more people are beaten to death than are killed by long guns. >> schieffer: the people who are surviving gunshot wounds now, it's because we have better medical help, david, for the same reason-- >> that's good. >> schieffer: yes, it's good. it's the same reason more of our people are surviving on the battlefields, but that's not the end of it. why do you-- why
. appreciate it. france is pretty good, too. >> bye. >>> coming up, the early read on the trading session from the futures pits in chicago. >>> first, are you expecting a year-end bonus? what is that? you ever heard of -- no. we have not. a survey by challenger, gray, and christmas finds three out of four -- three out of four? will be handing them out. three out of four. thanks, nick. >> we're the bottom four. >> we're the four. handing them out, up 53%. we get these buttons. that's up 53% from a year ago. [ male announcer ] when gloria and her financial advisor made a retirement plan, they considered all her assets, even those held elsewhere, giving her the confidence to pursue all her goals. when you want a financial advisor who sees the whole picture, turn to us. wells fargo advisors. ♪ [ engine revs ] ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] the mercedes-benz winter event is back, with the perfect vehicle that's just right for you, no matter which list you're on. [ santa ] ho, ho, ho, ho! [ male announcer ] lease a 2013 ml350 for $599 a month at your local mercedes-benz dealer. >>> dow futures up. s&p
the swiss franc. let's show where you we stand with oil prices right now. we've got nymex trading at 89. present at 110. both of them fairly steady. what about the outlook? joining us is peter hunt at rbc. peter, good morning to you. so does oil stay in this sort of recent ranges for the foreseeable future? >> actually we think it is. it sounds like sort of the risk of complacency. something we challenge ourselves on quite regularly. but given the points about china demand and global gdp, we're still very cautious in terms of demand, but the issue for the oil markets is supply and there are still big movements going on there. i think over the last three months, you've seen a really sharp fall in the output from iran. that's down below 3 million barrels a day for the first type since at least 2000. a lot of those volumes have been physically made by increases in iraq. but while they can make up the volume, they don't make up for the sense of instability. and i think as long as you have iran producing around a million down from a high of 4 billion only in 2008 and still needs to generate
needed to move on to our primary objectives beyond the beach, more deeply into france, in normandy. and i was eventually assigned to one general's army. january 5th, 1944. it was a warm welcome to the americans they saw that day. the french were delighted. they threw flowers and kisses and so on. after the liberation of paris, our mission was to move rapidly eastward, general patton with his tank division was moving rapidly. we followed him in the liberation of belgium, lutzenburg -- luxembourg and into holland in 1944. were we getting close to the time of the battle of the bulge. we then got back our artillery forces and the support groups and we proceeded to attack across into germany. >> there's much more to the story. next, the images he will never be able to forget. >>> 71 years ago following the bombing of pearl harbor, the u.s. entered world war ii. they then moveded into germany and witnessed firsthand horrors of the haolocaust. you're about to see stark images of the war, sights that waitzman say still live with him to this very day. >> our first contact is what we call the holoc
will have an opportunity. >> i think, though, of france. would you stay in france? >> of course we will. >> you see people moving out of france. >> we can have opinions about their policies. i think they're doing some things that are counterproductive, by the way, that they're finding that way. the government is a huge part of their gdp, decision making is not really marketing. there's unintended consequences of their policy. for example, if you cannot shut down a poorly performing or money losing factory, what effect will that have on somebody who might want to expand his or her business? if you know that you can never -- if you know you have a liquidity -- illiquidity and can never get out of a position, are you much less likely to go into it? sure. the ramifications and consequence of their policies are starting to be felt there now. we're not going to get out of it. it's a big gdp. we're very active there. some of the greatest companies in the world are french companies. >> i asked this of jamie, and it's an important question, given some of the reputational hit that goldman took ov
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